Tips & Tricks: Reduce Time Lost to the Infinite Scroll

Those of us with executive dysfunction and smartphones know all to well how easy it can be to lose hours a day to scrolling through social media without meaning to, or even realizing when it’s happening.

The act of switching away from one task (e.g., scrolling through social media) and to another (e.g., things you’re actually supposed to be doing) is part of the executive function of cognitive flexibility (CF), and getting stuck in the infinite scroll is just one way CF dysfunction can manifest.

If the infinite scroll is stealing time away from things you’d rather be doing, you might want to try setting usage alerts (helpful when so many of us also deal with time numbness) and/or limiting the time your phone or browser allows you to be on certain apps.

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RESEARCH: Data‐driven identification of subtypes of executive function across typical development, ADHD, and ASD (2020)

POST SUMMARY
This study looks at the executive function (EF) and brain scans of ADHD, autistic, or neurotypical children between the ages of 8-17 to find EF subgroups. They have found three: those that struggled most with (1) flexibility & emotional regulation; (2) inhibitory control and impulsivity; and (3) working memory, organizing, and planning. All three groups of children were spread out over all three subtypes, and in the brain scans there were more differences within same diagnoses than there were within these cross-diagnostic EF subtypes. This is important because treatments such as stimulants, cognitive training, or cognitive behavioral therapy each differently target the three subtypes.

Data‐driven identification of subtypes of executive function across typical development, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorders (2020)

  • Vaidya, C.J., You, X., Mostofsky, S., Pereira, F., Berl, M.M. and Kenworthy, L., Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
ABSTRACT

Article Highlights:

  • Impairment of executive function (EF), the goal-directed regulation of thoughts, actions, and emotions, drives negative outcomes and is common across neurodevelopmental disorders…”
    • One of the main difficulties in figuring out how to help executive dysfunction (EDf) is that EDf varies so much, both within and across conditions
  • “We observed three trans-diagnostic EF subtypes characterized by behavioral profiles that were defined by relative weakness in:”
    • “(a) behavioral flexibility and emotion regulation (FLEX- EMOT);
    • (b) hyperactivity/impulsivity and inhibition (INHIBIT); and
    • (c) working memory, organizing, and planning (METACOG).”
  • Even the TD [typically developing/neurotypical] children fell into these three categories, suggesting that the link between these certain EFs are normal in children and that “disordered EF is nested within normal variability.”

ADHD & Autism

  • “A large proportion of autistic children meet criteria for ADHD (41%–78%…).”
    • “Furthermore, 1 in 5 children diagnosed with ASD have a pre-existing ADHD diagnosis”
  • Comorbid ADHD exacerbates ASD social symptoms… and relates to worse:
    • adaptive function…
    • quality of life…
    • and intervention outcomes…”
  • “Furthermore, impairment is progressive, increasing from childhood to adolescence…
    • persistent, continuing despite amelioration of core ASD symptoms…
    • and drives negative outcomes…”

Participants:

  • Participants were two cohorts of mostly males (62.5% and 67.9%, respectively) between 8-17 years old with IQs > 70 and no medical diagnoses. Between the two groups there were 240 autistic, 307 ADHD, and 465 TD participants.

EF Subtypes across ADHD & ASD

  • The results showed that there are more similarities in the frontal-parietal recruitment of the brains of people in the same EF subtype, regardless of whether the brains belonged to someone who was TD, ASD, or ADHD, than there were between scans of people with the same diagnosis.
  • EF profiles spanned the normal to impaired spectrum,” “manifested as dispositional traits at the normative end and psychopathology at the maladaptive end.”
    • The TD children were fairly evenly distributed among all three subgroups, however:
    • the FLEX-EMOT subgroup had more ASD participants
    • the INHIBIT subgroup had more ADHD participants.
  • These findings are important for getting people the appropriate treatment as “[m]any evidence- based treatments for EF in children with developmental disabilities target specific ‘subtypes’ of EF deficit, for example:
    • central stimulants are evidence- based for inhibition, working memory and attention deficits,
    • while the computer-based treatment Cogmed improves working memory specifically…
    • and the cognitive-behavioral treatment Unstuck and On Target improves flexibility…”

EF Subtypes & rethinking diagnostic criteria

  • The results showed the insufficiency of the current diagnostic criteria for ADHD in the DSM.
    • Because, while “INHIBIT maps to Hyperactivity/Impulsivity”
    • Different groups of children being tested had differing levels of inattention between the INHIBIT and METACOG groups,
      • suggesting that focusing on a patient’s level of inattention has “limited utility as a distinguishing feature.”
    • In addition, 19% of ADHD children were in the FLEX-EMOT group, which is not explained by the current DSM diagnostic criteria or subtypes,
      • “…community detection applied to temperamental traits in ADHD revealed segregation by positive and negative emotion regulation problems…which suggests that FLEX- EMOT profile may be further segregated upon deeper phenotyping.”
  • Importantly, among ASD children “only half of the samples in each cohort showed the FLEX-EMOT profile, which challenges the often held notion of cognitive inflexibility as the hallmark EF comorbidity in ASD”

Future Research:

  • “Further, deeper phenotyping would be helpful to parse the type of difficulties in regulating externalizing behaviors (e.g., rule-breaking vs. aggression) that are associated with disinhibition or inflexibility.”
  • “Future neuroimaging studies can identify the ‘signatures’ of activation and connectivity patterns that signify EF subtype, with AUC values [severity] serving as a continuous dimension to probe the EF profile spectrum.”
  • “Additionally, whether the observed tripartite structure is stable developmentally and generalizes beyond ADHD and ASD diagnoses and in a broader age range needs to be tested in future work,” as does establishing “the clinical importance of the observed tripartite structure by testing predictive validity for outcomes (e.g., treatment efficacy)”

CITATION

Vaidya, C.J., You, X., Mostofsky, S., Pereira, F., Berl, M.M. and Kenworthy, L. (2020), Data‐driven identification of subtypes of executive function across typical development, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. J Child Psychol Psychiatr, 61: 51-61. doi:10.1111/jcpp.13114

Google Scholar Links 12/20/19

Here are this week’s top 12 articles from our EF Google Scholar alerts!

  1. A meta-analysis of the associations between theory of mind and neurocognition in schizophrenia (2019)
  2. Can Multifactorial Cognitive Training Slow Down the Cognitive Decline in Early Alzheimer Patients? (2019)
  3. Cognitive flexibility and response inhibition in patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (2019)
  4. Failures of executive function when at a height: Negative height-related appraisals are associated with poor executive function during a virtual height stressor (2019)
  5. Increasing Extrinsic Motivation Improves Time-Based Prospective Memory in Adults with Autism: Relations with Executive Functioning and Mentalizing (2019)
  6. Patterns, Mathematics, Early Literacy, and Executive Functions (2019)
  7. Rethinking executive function development (2019)
  8. The Examination of the Classroom Accommodations to Address Executive Functioning Issues for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder in an Inclusive Classroom Setting: A Case Study (2019)
  9. The Impact Of Social Robots Intervention On Improving The Executive Functions In Children With Autism Disorder (2019, Only the abstract is in English)
  10. The Relationship Between Executive Function And Fine Motor Skills In 2-Year-Old Children (2019)
  11. Theory of Mind and Language in Childhood Epilepsy (2019)
  12. Walking, talking, and suppressing: executive functioning mediates the relationship between higher expressive suppression and slower dual-task walking among older adults (2019)

Google Scholar Links 11/15/19

Here are this week’s top 10 articles from our EF Google Scholar alerts!

  1. An fMRI study of inhibitory control and the effects of exposure to violence in Latin-American early adolescents: alterations in frontoparietal activation and performance (2019)
  2. Empirical Failures of the Claim That Autistic People Lack a Theory of Mind (2019)
  3. Executive Cognitive Functions and Behavioral Control Differentially Predict HbA1c in Type 1 Diabetes across Emerging Adulthood (2019)
  4. Impact of Secondary ADHD on Long-Term Outcomes After Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury (2019)
  5. Intelligence and executive functions in 9–10 year-old preterm children born with very low and extremely low birth weight (2019)
  6. Improving Executive Functioning Skills in Children with Autism through Cognitive Training Program (2019)
  7. Online Family Problem-Solving Therapy (F-PST) for Executive and Behavioral Dysfunction After Traumatic Brain Injury in Adolescents: A Randomized, Multicenter, Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial (2019)
  8. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Thyroid Hormone Transporter Genes MCT8, MCT10 and Deiodinase DIO2 Contribute to Inter-Individual Variance of Executive Functions and Personality Traits (2019)
  9. The connection between executive functioning and comprehension of figurative language in students with and without learning disabilities (2019)
  10. The Stroop effect: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis in healthy young adults (2020)